Michael Chertoff, who served as Homeland Secretary under George W. Bush, joins Andrea Mitchell to explain how the Trump administration can use the emergency powers in the Defense Production Act to facilitate the response to the coronavirus and get supplies to states and localities.

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Michael Chertoff, who served as Homeland Secretary under George W. Bush, joins Poppy Harlow on CNN's Newsroom to explain the Coronavirus response and its impacts on national security.

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Chad Sweet, The Chertoff Group CEO and former DHS Chief of Staff, joins Yahoo Finance's Zack Guzman and Akiko Fujita to discuss how the federal government is responding to the coronavirus on The Ticker.

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Chad Sweet, Chertoff Group CEO and co-founder, joins CNBC's ‘Power Lunch’ to discuss the hit taken by the cruise industry.

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Since the U.S. declared India to be a “Major Defense Partner” in 2016, U.S-India defense ties have been widely trumpeted, but the reality of the relationship continues to trail far behind the rhetoric. The President’s upcoming trip to India on February 24th presents an excellent opportunity to confront and resolve the major sticking points that have bedeviled lower level officials. Ironically, the Trump administration’s sharply transactional approach may be just what is needed to achieve strategic ends.

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The United States (US) department of treasury has released new rules, governing investment into the US that Indian executives, especially in the technology, infrastructure and data sectors, ought to study carefully. The US is India’s largest trading partner, and over the last decade, Indian businesses have more than doubled their investment into the US, with foreign direct investment approaching $10 billion annually. This increased investment comes with an increased need for businesses to be sensitive to the unique regulations of both countries, especially when those laws reflect a major change in policy.

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If you are a technology company looking for capital and have some interested Chinese investors, you may want to broaden your sights.

On Jan. 13, the Treasury Department issued landmark regulations that will scrutinize foreign investments into critical technology firms—especially those from China. These rules will dramatically expand the scope of the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS), a U.S. interagency committee that considers the threat, vulnerability, and potential impact on national security of a foreign investment transaction.

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Establishing norms for shared global common goods and tackling common challenges has long been a concern in international relations, largely because doing so is in tension with the traditional view of state sovereignty. For example, sustainability concerns and maritime competition challenged the unrestricted freedom of the seas while the rise of nuclear weapons created an urgent security threat that demanded global norms. In each of these cases, collaborative efforts were undertaken to establish regimes and common principles that would ease tension and increase the likelihood of peace.

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This week the Treasury Department released new regulations that represent the tip of the spear in American efforts to maintain its technological and geopolitical leadership. Two years ago, Congress granted a little-known government interagency body called the Committee on Foreign Investment in the U.S. (CFIUS) new powers through the creation of the Foreign Investment Risk Review Modernization Act (FIRRMA). Amid intense coverage of domestic and international crises, the public can be forgiven if these regulations aren’t front of mind. Yet, attention should be paid because the impact of this law – which comes into full effect on Feb. 13 – will be far greater than the law’s anodyne acronym suggests.

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On Monday, congressional leaders announced that their government-wide spending bill for fiscal year 2020 will include $425 million for states to protect U.S. elections against foreign interference and cyberattacks.

This is an important, if overdue, step in the right direction. But our election systems need far more than a one-time rescue mission. To secure American elections in 2020 and beyond, Congress and the local election officials who will soon receive these funds must treat them as a starting point.

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